How to write a learning journal example

Prehistoric literacy[ edit ] Origins of literacy[ edit ] Literacy is emerged with the development of numeracy and computational devices as early as 8, BCE.

How to write a learning journal example

When your child is creative and curious, she can come up with answers to the problems she encounters—like how to keep the block tower from falling. Creativity helps your child become a thoughtful, inquisitive, and confident learner later on, when she starts school.

One of the most important ways that your toddler is tuning in to her creativity is by experimenting with art materials. As she grabs that chunky crayon and gets to work, you will see her art and writing change and become more controlled and complex as she grows.

For very young children, art and early writing skills are one and the same. Then your child discovers the link between her hand holding the crayon and the line she made on the page: She experiences the power of cause-and-effect. Imagine how exciting this must be for her!

This leap in thinking skills is helped along by her new ability to hold things in her hands and fingers. The growing control your child has over the muscles in her hands lets her move a marker or paintbrush with purpose and with a goal in mind. For very young children, there are four stages of drawing and writing that you may see as your child grows from 15 months old to 3 years old.

how to write a learning journal example

Note that the timetables listed below are approximate; your child may master these skills faster or slower and still be developing just fine.

There is joy in creating art at all ages, but at this stage especially, many children relish the feedback they are getting from their senses: For other children, this sensory information may be too much and they may not enjoy some art activities at this stage like finger-painting.

Inquiry-based learning - Wikipedia

As they grow to tolerate more sensory input, you can incrementally re-introduce art activities into their routine. Controlled Scribbling 2 years to 3 years As children develop better control over the muscles in their hands and fingers, their scribbles begin to change and become more controlled.

Toddlers may make repeated marks on the page—open circles, diagonal, curved, horizontal, or vertical lines. Over time, children make the transition to holding the crayon or marker between their thumb and pointer finger. They try to imitate this in their own writing. So while they may not write actual letters, you may see components of letters in their drawing.

These might include lines, dots, and curves. This is an exciting time as your toddler realizes that his drawing conveys meaning! For example, he may write something down and then tell you what word it says.

This is an important step toward reading and writing. This ability to hold an image in your mind and then represent it on the page is a thinking skill that takes some time to develop. At first, children name their unplanned creations. This means that they finish the picture and then label their masterpiece with the names of people, animals, or objects they are familiar with.

This changes over time.

Conversations in the cloud

Soon you will see your child clearly planning prior to drawing what he will create. You will also see more detail in the pictures, more control in the way your child handles the crayon or marker, and the use of more colors.

What else to be on the lookout for? Once your child has begun to purposefully draw images, she has mastered symbolic thinking.VoiceThread Universal lets you browse threads and hear comments in pages specially designed for screen readers. Click here to go to VoiceThread Universal.

iClicker is the market-leader in student and audience response systems for Higher Education, recognized for ease-of-use, reliability, and focus on pedagogy. SAMPLE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ENTRY FOR A JOURNAL ARTICLE.

The following example uses APA style (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, ) for the journal citation:Waite, L. J., Goldschneider, F. K., & Witsberger, C. (). Enter data on Alu PV92, test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and compare human populations by contingency chi-square, genetic drift, and genetic distance.

Includes PV92 reference data from more than 40 world populations. If you're looking for the assessment tool page, please look at the archive copy | Freeman.

A concept map is a special form of a web diagram for exploring knowledge and gathering and sharing information. Dear Colleague: With my pioneer research in the past 50 years, we learned a lot about acquiring languages by observing infants.

For example, infants do not start life speaking their native language.

ReadWriteThink - ReadWriteThink